Parts of a Badminton Racket

Badminton is a thrilling game. And to put up a spirited play, you need the best badminton racket. Badminton rackets differ in length and size. That’s because there are different versions for kids, adults, professionals, and recreational purposes.

Although there are varieties of badminton rackets, the core parts are the same. Here are the parts you need to know.

Main Parts of a Badminton Racquet

Stringed Area

Stringed Area of a Badminton Racquet

As the name suggests, it’s the netted part of the racket. The string bed is the part that hits the shuttlecock. And according to the Badminton World Federation, the string bed must be flat. In terms of measurement, it shouldn’t exceed a width of 220mm and length of 280mm.

Usually, the strings are of elastic carbon or nylon material. Also, they assume an interlaced pattern that crisscrosses one another and connects to the frame.

Head

Head

 

The head is the metal ring that bounds the stringed area. Each of the strings makes a tie at the ring. A racket’s head shape is vital. It influences your gameplay. Usually, there are two main head shapes:

Oval head

Oval head

The oval head is the most common racket head shape. And owing to its structure, it has a narrow sweet spot. Most professionals like the oval-shaped racket. That’s because it offers more power in every shot. But beginners don’t like it due to the narrow sweet spot.

Isometric head

Isometric head

An isometric head is slightly broader at the top of the head. For that reason, it offers a large sweet spot. So when you make a swing, you have more chances of smacking the shuttle better. So most beginner badminton players prefer the isometric heat type.

Throat

Throat

The throat is the part of the racquet that links the head to the shaft. It’s also termed the heart or the T-joint. Similarly, it provides a solid base for the head. But not all rackets have visible throats.

Some prominent badminton racket brands have throats incorporated into the head. In most cases, rackets targeting amateur badminton players have more visible throats.

Shaft

Shaft

In a racket, the shaft is the thin extended rod that connects the throat and the grip. But in the absence of the throat, it joins the handle directly to the base of the head. Shafts vary in stiffness and flexibility.

A flexible shaft creates more rebound power in every hit. Thus it supports a powerful shot at the shuttle. Amateur players, hence, find it very ideal.

On the other hand, a stiff shaft doesn’t bend on hitting the shuttle. For that reason, it gives the player more advantage in control of the shot. Therefore most pro badminton players love racquets with stiff shafts.

The Handle

The Handle

During a match, a player holds a racket by the handle. So the handle is the bottom part of the racquet that attaches to the shaft. The handle has a material called the grip around.

There are two types of grip; synthetic and towel grip. The synthetic grip is durable but has poor absorbency of sweat. On the other hand, towel grip isn’t long-lasting but boasts superior absorbency of perspiration.

Therefore the handle helps a player know the correct part of holding the racket. The grip that wraps on the handle cushions your hand. So you can play for extended hours and still maintain a comfortable hold of the racket.

Butt Cap

Butt Cap

The butt cap is at the bottommost part of the racket. Often it’s of plastic and is easy to slip on and off. Most companies print their logo on the butt cap.

During prolonged play, the butt cap helps you maintain a firm grasp on the racket. And with a firm grip of the racquet, you can make accurate and powerful shots.

Conclusion

At a glance, the badminton racket looks simple. However, it has distinct parts, each with its function. And knowing the role of each section helps in maintaining a badminton racket to remain in the correct state.

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