Basic Badminton Terms – Badminton 101 Expressions

Each sport has its basic terms and rules. And badminton is no exception. The foundation of learning badminton is to understand is basic terms.

So read on to know the usual badminton terms you need to grasp. Often you’ll hear the expressions in tournaments.

Use more of these phrases while practicing badminton at home. By so doing, they’ll become part of you.

Basic Badminton Terms

Shuttlecock

Type of Shuttlecock you Use

The badminton shuttlecock is also known as a birdie. It refers to the object that players hit. The average weight of the birdie is 17 to 19 ounces.

The shuttlecock consists of several parts; goatskin cover, cork tip, and goose feathers. A standard shuttlecock lasts about two games. A heavy birdie flies faster than a lighter one.

Racket

Types of Racket

Some people also call it a racquet. It refers to the piece of equipment that players use to hit the shuttlecock. The racquet is 27 inches long and weighs about 3 ounces.

It consists of strings interwoven on a frame in a concise pattern. The framework often is of ceramic, graphite, or boron. On the other hand, the best badminton string is high-quality materials such as the natural gut.

Rally

Rally

In badminton, rally refers to the exchange of a shuttlecock between players back and forth. One player begins by hitting the birdie initially, and the opponent hits back.

The rally goes on till one person either misses the birdie or hits it outside the recommended area.

Serve (Service)

Serve (Service)

A serve refers to the initial shot at the shuttlecock. Usually, a toss of the coin distinguishes the player to make the serve. And in singles, if you lose a rally, the service changes to your opponent.

When serving, the two opposing players must take a diagonal stand on different sides of the net. Then the server holds the racquet head down and hits the birdie below the waistline.

Court

court

Badminton court refers to the area stipulated for playing the sport. The outer boundary lines define the extent where the court reaches.

Service Court

Service Court

It refers to the permitted area where the shuttlecock hits. Note that the service court for doubles and singles differ.

After carrying out the service, the shuttlecock must hit anywhere in the service court. Otherwise, the badminton shot becomes a fault.

Forecourt

Forecourt

Like its name suggests it’s the front part of the court from the net to the short service line. It takes about a third of the court. Often badminton drop shots fall in the forecourt.

Short Service Line

Short Service Line

It’s the line that lies six and a half feet away from the net. For a service to be legal, it must go beyond the short service line. Otherwise, that particular serve becomes wrong.

Centerline

Center line

In the badminton court, the centerline bisects the net at ninety degrees. Its chief role is to define the left from the right service section of the court.

Match

Lowers Your Risk of Developing Hypertension

A match refers to the set of badminton games that defines a winner. Over the years, the scoring system in badminton has changed greatly. But currently, the overall winner must garner a victory in 3 out of 5 best badminton sets.

Midcourt

Midcourt

The midcourt refers to the central area of the badminton court. It lies halfway between the net and the back boundary line. A large percentage of players aim their smashes in badminton at the mid-court.

Backcourt

Backcourt

It’s also the same as the rear court. And it’s the back third of the badminton court.

Alley

Alley

An alley refers to the area defined by the parallel lines on both sides of the court. Some players also call it third court or back alley. Usually, when you make a long serve, lob, or drive it lands in the third court.

Ace

Ace

The ace refers to the kind of service that your opponent misses to hit back. It calls for high accuracy and knowledge about your opponent to make an ace.

Carry

The Flexibility of the Wrist Matters

It’s an illegal type of shot in the sport. It occurs when a player traps the birdie with the racket then releases it in a manner that simulates a throw.

Clear

Clear

It’s the type of shot that penetrates deep into your opponent’s court. A clear high shot gives you more time to compose before the opponent hits back.

Lob

Lob

It’s the kind of shot that forms an arc and goes high above your competitor’s head.

Net a Shot

Net a Shot

A net shot comes from the forecourt, barely crosses the net, and drops down sharply onto the ground.

Push Shot

PushShot

It comes from a gentle push of the shuttlecock. The push shot involves a slight wrist action to propel the birdie. It’s most effective when you are in the midcourt or close to the net.

Smash

Smash Grip Technique

A smashing shot is taking a hard overhead hit on the shuttlecock. Such action gives the birdie a sharp downward trajectory.

Flick

Honing Your Reflexes and Concentration Skills

It’s a deceptive short that involves quick movement of the forearm and wrist. Its purpose is to turn an otherwise-looking short serve into a long shot.

For example, when reacting to a drop shot you might fake another drop shot. However, at last, you make a flick hit, and it changes into a lob.

Drive

Drive

A drive shot takes a horizontal trajectory. However, it goes low, fast, and barely over the net.

Conclusion

There you have the most common badminton terms you need to know. Take your time to master the meaning of each of the phrases. That way you won’t present a puzzled look when the umpire calls out any of the above terms.

 

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